Fortress Investment Group diversified portfolio

The current Chief Executive Officer Randy Nardone along with Wes Edens and Randy Briger founded Fortress Investment Group (FIG) in 1998. The three principals back in 1998 wanted to take an alternative approach to invest. Fortress creates investment opportunities by leveraging capital and using it to invest in technology companies, this approach is the genesis of alternative-asset investing. The alternative-asset investing approach of Fortress lead to extremely fast growth and was able to propel the hedge fund to become the first such firm to be listed on the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE).

FIG launched its first investment fund portfolio in 1999, which was compromised mainly of real estate investments under the name if Fortress Investment Fund I. Fortress Investment Fund I would eventually lead to version II, III and IV along the way expanding to include other sectors of investment opportunities. From the time of the launching of Fortress Investment Fund I in 1999, by 2006 the firm witnessed an almost 40% increase in growth. During this time of rapid growth, FIG added Michael Novogratz as the new hedge fund manager. It was in 2006 also, that FIG initiated the acquisition of RailAmerica Inc. FIG acquired RailAmerica for a little more than $16.35 in shares which were finalized in February 2007. Two years later FIG would sell RailAmerica by making shares available to the public via an IPO. That same year FIG would purchase Florida East Coast Industries (FECI). FECI is the parent company of Florida East Coast Railway the deal was valued at $3.5 billion.

FIG is an industry leader in high diversified global investments, responsible for managing $36.1 billion in assets. Fig is responsible for managing assets belonging to almost 2000 clients. FIG continues to hold and manage a highly diversified portfolio containing many firms around the world. FIG’s portfolio contains notable names such as Green Tree Servicing LLC, Holiday Retirement, Nationstar Mortgage LLC, Springleaf Financial, and RailAmerica,

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Talos Energy Takes a Risk in the Gulf of Mexico

After two days of intense rain in Kingwood, Texas, Tim Duncan was worried about more than Hurricane Harvey’s attack on his neighborhood. The night was soon to come, and the power was out when Tim Duncan received news that six feet of floodwaters were on the way. Tim waded through the water to lift his wife, son, and two dogs on a FEMA boat. As the chief executive of Talos Energy, Tim Duncan had more than one worry on his mind. For the previous four months, he had strategically calculated and positioned the $2.5 billion merger of his company with a publicly traded and bankrupt company, Stone Energy.

It was a risky move to merge with the large company that was almost as big as his, but there was an advantage if the risky move paid off. Acquiring and merging with Stone Energy would make Talos Energy a publicly traded company without having to go through the expense of a public offering. Duncan was determined to make the deal go through and wouldn’t let the flood intervene in the merger. Duncan used a private plane to head to Alabama, and once he returned to Texas, he stayed at his parent’s Houston home which was safe from Harvey’s wrath. He worked every evening for weeks from his parent’s kitchen table and negotiated the merger.

Once the merger was complete Talos Energy scheduled to take on Stone’s listing in May. The new ticker will read TALO. Tim Duncan will control the oil company with an estimated annual revenue of nine hundred million dollars. Talos’ total assets will be located in the Gulf of Mexico. Talos is like a wildcatter. Tim Duncan is taking a risk. When others are focused on the Permian Basin, he is taking a risk in politically uncertain Mexico. Talos can produce 48,000 barrels a day but aims for more in the future.

Concern from Jason Hope over the Rise of Exploitation in IoT Vulnerabilities by Hackers

Everyone today knows how important and difficult it is to protect your personal data, credit cards, Social Security Number, your current location, etc. However, with the proliferation of IoT-enabled devices, many of which are small and low-powered, hackers are increasingly finding new places to sneak inside.

The prime concern of Jason Hope, a member of the IoT Council, is that unless your device, be it a pacemaker, your new fridge, or even the coffee maker at the local Starbucks, has the encrypting power of a current Android or iPhone, a basic login password will simply not be enough to protect it anymore, and e-commerce is making this all too real. The aforementioned coffee maker could be connecting your latte to your bank account, and in doing so, leaking said data to the guy hidden in the corner on his iPad, presumably surfing the web. Visit his facebook to learn more about his platforms.

Also, there is the rapidly increasing market for smart-home devices, most of which are connected over IoT, and, as Jason Hope is quick to point out, with “their remote management software, IoT devices are often seen as wide open for remote exploitation.” 1 Basically, with a knockoff IoT door lock, well, you might as well leave the front door wide open for hackers to stroll through.

What I am saying is, or rather, Jason Hope is meaning, is with the “recent rise in IoT device attacks and the attractiveness to hackers of sensitive data-laden interfaces,” 1 the current protection protocols are simply not enough anymore in today’s digital age, while an IoT lock may not have any sensitive data on it, the interior of your house will. While the odds of someone maliciously taking over a pacemaker or a Goggle Chrome car may seem low (and they are), such acts are not outside the realm of possibility. Simply put, if it connects, it will be connected, one way or another.

Jason Hope is actively urging manufacturers of IoT devices to employ digitally signed and encrypted firmware within said devices, as a baseline expectation at the very least. Such improvements should stop casual attacks from even knocking on the metaphorical door. Also, on a website both named and run Jason Hope himself, he stresses how vitally important it is to still maintain a strong password, and to change it frequently, especially if you have an IoT-enabled vehicle. A password might not always stop a hacker, but a strong one may just prevent one from walking right through the front door. Literally.

Read more: http://www.marketwired.com/press-release/entrepreneur-jason-hope-invests-in-research-against-aging-1929598.htm